Bruny Island Day Tour from Hobart, Tasmania

Aaron/ August 31, 2019/ Oceania/ 0 comments

A Bruny Island day tour itinerary from Hobart, Tasmania. Beautiful coastlines, forests, and delicious local produce.

Bruny Island options

There are a couple of ways to explore Bruny Island. You can choose to rent a vehicle or go with a tour, do a day tour or stay overnight. There are a few companies offering the day tours but in the end we decided to go with Tassie Tours’ Bruny Island Tour at the recommendation of our hostel. Was also among the cheapest we managed to find at AUD110 per person.

I think it was good, but if you’re looking for alternatives Bruny Island Safaris seems to be another major player. Their itinerary is pretty similar, with more focus on food and at a slightly higher price (AUD155). The price includes lunch and the Cape Bruny Lighthouse tour adding those in the prices are pretty similar. However those are optional so if you’re not interested in either then the Tassie Tours is more economical. Bruny Island Safaris does other Bruny Island itineraries as well, such as overnight trips and bushwalking tours.

If you’re driving here’s the timetable and here are the prices. Or if you’re on a tour, nothing to worry about as all transport will be settled, right from the doorstep of your accommodation in Hobart, a 35 min drive away. While pedestrians travel free on the ferry I don’t think there is a public transport option to get to the harbor, and even less likely there’s public transport on Bruny Island, so it seems to be either tour or rent a car.

Departing Kettering

The dreary weather that had lingered the first few days of our trip in Tasmania were long gone, and it was a beautiful day. Being slightly late in the season (May), we had a small group traveling that day. Quite a fun and jovial bunch, livened up by the friendly driver/ guide. We were the first to be picked up, and after a quick drive around town to get everyone we were on our way to Kettering for the ferry to Bruny Island.

The Bruny Island ferry at Kettering on the mainland of Tasmania
The Bruny Island ferry at Kettering on the mainland of Tasmania
Breezy on the deck.
Breezy on the deck.

Bruny Island Honey

First stop, Bruny Island Honey, where you can taste different kinds of honey and check out some information on bee production. Mostly a shopfront, not much production here. Sampling different honey one after another brings out the subtle difference (in some cases not so subtle) that I’ll probably miss if trying them individually. Also interesting to see what a Manuka plant looks like.

As for prices compared to the city, I didn’t see this brand in supermarkets, and the prices here seem cheaper than the souvenir shops selling them. Range is much larger too.

Bruny Island Honey.
Bruny Island Honey.

Truganini Lookout/ The Neck

Next up, the most recognizable spot on Bruny Island! It’s a long walk up the flight of stairs but the view from the top, 100% worth it. Fortunately we arrived early, as it got crowded around the time we left.

From the viewing platform of Truganini Lookout, top of the flight of stairs. Bruny Island, Tasmania.
From the viewing platform of Truganini Lookout, top of the flight of stairs.
The flight of stairs, straight up the slope to Truganini Lookout. Bruny Island, Tasmania.
The flight of stairs, straight up the slope to Truganini Lookout.

Insider tip! Our guide then brought us to this camping ground somewhere towards the other end of the neck. It was so peaceful and quiet on the beach, and native wildlife have been spotted here.

The beach further down the Neck. Bruny Island, Tasmania.
The beach further down the Neck.
Sand and sea. Bruny Island, Tasmania.
Sand and sea.
Not meaning to advertise for them, but cute birds stopped by the wipers as we were checking out the secluded beach.
Not meaning to advertise for them, but cute birds stopped by the wipers as we were checking out the secluded beach.

White wallabies of Bruny

Next up we headed towards Adventure Bay to try to spot the mysterious white wallabies. Our sharp eyed guide found some in the distance by the edge of the forest. It was on private land though so this was as close as we got. Can you see them? The little white spec in the middle of each photo. With better luck you might see them up closer.

That little white spec that is the white wallaby.
That little white spec that is the white wallaby.
Another white spec.
Another white spec.

Other wallabies

Around that area though, the normal colored ones are pretty common, and seem to be lingering anywhere from driveways to backyards.

Wallaby in the driveway.
Wallaby in the driveway.

So much so that roadkill is a problem, and we even spotted a ran over wallaby by the road.

Wallabies in the backyard.
Wallabies in the backyard.
Three's a crowd.
Three’s a crowd.

Waterfall Creek Rainforest Walk

No waterfalls here though. I think the area is also called Mavista Nature Walk. There’s a shelter marking the start of the trail. A return walk to the end will take about 30 mins, and is pretty comfortable. After the week on the Overland Track I thought I couldn’t be amazed by forests for awhile but this was stunning. Felt like I was walking through the set of Jurassic Park.

Walking through the lush rainforest, the tall ferns looking prehistoric. Waterfall Creek, Bruny Island, Tasmania.
Walking through the lush rainforest, the tall ferns looking prehistoric.
Life all around.
Life all around.
And some curious fungi.
And some curious fungi.

Rest stop at Adventure Bay Community Hall

Stopped by Adventure Bay Community Hall next for a toilet/ snack break. There’s a general store in the vicinity for quick snacks.

Sculpture by the beach at Adventure Bay Community Hall.
Sculpture by the beach at Adventure Bay Community Hall.

Two Tree Point, Resolution Creek

This was where early explorers in the late 16th century got their freshwater supplies. From paintings done then it appears that little has changed since then, including the 2 trees still standing. That would mean the trees are over 250 years old! Just imagine this scene, 250 years ago when European explorers set foot on this shore.

The famous two trees at Two Tree Point, Bruny Island.
The famous two trees at Two Tree Point.
Waves crashing at Two Tree Point.
Waves crashing at Two Tree Point.
The rocky coastline at Two Tree Point.
The rocky coastline at Two Tree Point.

Lunch from Hotel Bruny

Next, we stopped by Hotel Bruny to pick up lunch. Our guide had a handy menu on board and called ahead with our orders, so we just had to pay and collect our food. Here’s their menu, go to Menu then Takeout. if you’re taking out. Or just enjoy your meal at Hotel Bruny.

Fish and Chips.
Fish and Chips.
Wallaby spring rolls. Tasted beefy.
Wallaby spring rolls. Tasted beefy.

Our guide brought us to a nice public picnic area by the sea to enjoy our lunch. It’s slightly up north from Hotel Bruny, at the turnoff at Alonnah Beach Club/ Shell Road.

Lunch by the sea.
Lunch by the sea.

Cape Bruny Lighthouse

Reaching the southern tip of Bruny Island, we arrived at Cape Bruny Lighthouse. It was built with convict labor and first lit in 1838, and is the second oldest lighthouse in Australia. It’s an uphill walk from the carpark to the lighthouse.

Cape Bruny Lighthouse.
Cape Bruny Lighthouse.
Cape Bruny Lighthouse, Bruny Island.
Cape Bruny Lighthouse.

It costs AUD 15 for the tour up the lighthouse. It was enough to put other tourists (mostly locals) off, and views around the lighthouse were amazing enough. We gave the tour a pass. Not before I took a shot of the beautiful staircase inside.

Bruny Island Lighthouse staircase.
Cape Bruny Lighthouse staircase.

There were amazing views in all directions, even walking in circles round the lighthouse was enjoyable. Here are some snippets that don’t quite capture the full beauty of it.

Courts Island, Bruny Island, Tasmania.
Courts Island.
Lighthouse Bay, Bruny Island, Tasmania.
Lighthouse Bay.

Bruny Island Chocolate Company

Similar to Bruny Island Honey this was just a shopfront. The chocolates were great though, especially the fudge. It was pricey but they do offer fudge offcuts at slightly more affordable prices.

Bruny Island Chocolate Company.
Bruny Island Chocolate Company.

Get Shucked

Straight from the farm to the drive thru. Doubt oysters get much fresher than this. Should definitely try oysters from Get Shucked while you’re at Bruny Island. Not just really fresh oysters but pretty affordable too!

Bruny Island Chocolate Company.
Bruny Island Chocolate Company.

Bruny Island Cheese and Beer Company

Our final stop in Bruny Island, the Bruny Island Cheese and Beer Company. Tasting the different cheese was a gastronomical adventure, with a different cheese for every palate.

Cheese tasting at Bruny Island Cheese and Beer Company.
Cheese tasting at Bruny Island Cheese and Beer Company.

What’s different here from the earlier shops, was that cheese was actually made here, and you can see cheese being made through the windows. There’s also plenty of local produce available for purchase here. You can also enjoy snacks at the cafe in the adjacent building, or grab a beer here.

Cheese in the window. Wheendow.
Cheese in the window. Wheendow.

Too many beers, wines and ciders. Can’t decide? They offer beer tasters too.

Grab a beer to round off the day.
Grab a beer to round off the day.

End of the Bruny Island Day Tour

After that it was back to the ferry then to the doorstep of our hostel. A little of everything on Bruny Island, the beach, the forests, and local produce. Seems quite possible to spend a few days here to spend more time at each stop and exploring more of the fresh local produce. Maybe next time, but for the next day in Hobart, Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary!

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